Wednesday, November 4, 2020

Python 3.10.0a2 is now available for testing

The engines of the secret release manager machine have finished producing a new pre-release. Go get it here:

https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-3100a2/ 

This is an early developer preview of Python 3.10

Major new features of the 3.10 series, compared to 3.9

Python 3.10 is still in development. This releasee, 3.10.0a2 is the second of six planned alpha releases.
Alpha releases are intended to make it easier to test the current state of new features and bug fixes and to test the release process.
During the alpha phase, features may be added up until the start of the beta phase (2021-05-03) and, if necessary, may be modified or deleted up until the release candidate phase (2021-10-04). Please keep in mind that this is a preview release and its use is not recommended for production environments.

Many new features for Python 3.10 are still being planned and written. Among the new major
new features and changes so far:

  • PEP 623 – Remove wstr from Unicode
  • PEP 604 – Allow writing union types as X | Y
  • PEP 612 – Parameter Specification Variables
  • PEP 626 – Precise line numbers for debugging and other tools.
  • bpo-38605from __future__ import annotations (PEP 563) is now the default.
  • (Hey, fellow core developer, if a feature you find important is missing from this list, let Pablo know.)

The next pre-release of Python 3.10 will be 3.10.0a3, currently scheduled for 2020-12-07.

More resources

And now for something completely different

The cardinality (the number of elements) of infinite sets can be one of the most surprising results of set theory. For example, there are the same amount of even natural numbers than natural numbers (which can be even or odd). There is also the same amount of rational numbers than natural numbers. But on the other hand, there are more real numbers between 0 and 1 than natural numbers! All these sets have infinite cardinality but turn out that some of these infinities are bigger than others. These infinite cardinalities normally are represented using aleph numbers. Infinite sets are strange beasts indeed.

Your friendly release team,
Ned Deily @nad
Steve Dower @steve.dower
Pablo Galindo Salgado @pablogsal

Monday, October 5, 2020

Python 3.9.0 is now available, and you can already test 3.10.0a1!

On behalf of the Python development community and the Python 3.9 release team, I’m pleased to announce the availability of Python 3.9.0.

Python 3.9.0 is the newest feature release of the Python language, and it contains many new features and optimizations. You can find Python 3.9.0 here:

https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-390/

Most third-party distributors of Python should be making 3.9.0 packages available soon.

See the “What’s New in Python 3.9” document for more information about features included in the 3.9 series. Detailed information about all changes made in 3.9.0 can be found in its change log.

Maintenance releases for the 3.9 series will follow at regular bi-monthly intervals starting in late November of 2020.

OK, boring! Where is Python 4?

Not so fast! The next release after 3.9 will be 3.10. It will be an incremental improvement over 3.9, just as 3.9 was over 3.8, and so on.

In fact, our newest Release Manager, Pablo Galindo Salgado, prepared the first alpha release of what will become 3.10.0 a year from now. You can check it out here:

https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-3100a1/

We hope you enjoy the new releases!

Thanks to all of the many volunteers who help make Python Development and these releases possible! Please consider supporting our efforts by volunteering yourself or through organization contributions to the Python Software Foundation.

https://www.python.org/psf/

More resources

Your friendly release team,
Ned Deily @nad
Steve Dower @steve.dower
Pablo Galindo Salgado @pablogsal
Łukasz Langa @ambv

 

Friday, October 2, 2020

Python 3.5 is no longer supported

Python 3.5 is no longer supported.  There will be no more bug fixes or security patches for the 3.5 series, and Python 3.5.10 is the last release.  The Python core development community recommends that all remaining Python 3.5 users should upgrade to the latest version.

Thursday, September 24, 2020

Python 3.8.6 is now available

Python 3.8.6 is the sixth maintenance release of Python 3.8. Go get it here:

https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-386/

 

Maintenance releases for the 3.8 series will continue at regular bi-monthly intervals, with 3.8.7 planned for mid-November 2020.

What’s new?

The Python 3.8 series is the newest feature release of the Python language, and it contains many new features and optimizations. See the “What’s New in Python 3.8” document for more information about features included in the 3.8 series.

Python 3.8 is becoming more stable. Our bugfix releases are becoming smaller as we progress. This one contains 122 changes, less than two thirds of the previous average for a new release. Detailed information about all changes made in version 3.8.6 specifically can be found in its change log. Note that compared to 3.8.5 this release also contains all changes present in 3.8.6rc1.

We hope you enjoy Python 3.8!

Thanks to all of the many volunteers who help make Python Development and these releases possible! Please consider supporting our efforts by volunteering yourself or through organization contributions to the Python Software Foundation.

Your friendly release team,
Ned Deily @nad
Steve Dower @steve.dower
Łukasz Langa @ambv

Thursday, September 17, 2020

Python 3.9.0rc2 is now available for testing

 Python 3.9.0 is almost ready. This release, 3.9.0rc2, is the last planned preview before the final release of Python 3.9.0 on 2020-10-05. Get it here:


In the mean time, we strongly encourage maintainers of third-party Python projects to prepare their projects for 3.9 compatibility during this phase. As always, report any issues to the Python bug tracker.

Please keep in mind that this is a preview release and its use is not recommended for production environments.

Information for core developers

The 3.9 branch is now accepting changes for 3.9.1. To maximize stability, the final release will be cut from the v3.9.0rc2 tag. If you need the release manager to cherry-pick any critical fixes, mark issues as release blockers and/or add him as a reviewer on a critical backport PR on GitHub.

To see which changes are currently cherry-picked for inclusion in 3.9.0, look at the short-lived branch-v3.9.0 on GitHub.

Installer news

This is the first version of Python to default to the 64-bit installer on Windows. The installer now also actively disallows installation on Windows 7. Python 3.9 is incompatible with this unsupported version of Windows.

Major new features of the 3.9 series, compared to 3.8

Some of the new major new features and changes in Python 3.9 are:

  • PEP 584, Union Operators in dict
  • PEP 585, Type Hinting Generics In Standard Collections
  • PEP 593, Flexible function and variable annotations
  • PEP 602, Python adopts a stable annual release cadence
  • PEP 615, Support for the IANA Time Zone Database in the Standard Library
  • PEP 616, String methods to remove prefixes and suffixes
  • PEP 617, New PEG parser for CPython
  • BPO 38379, garbage collection does not block on resurrected objects;
  • BPO 38692, os.pidfd_open added that allows process management without races and signals;
  • BPO 39926, Unicode support updated to version 13.0.0;
  • BPO 1635741, when Python is initialized multiple times in the same process, it does not leak memory anymore;
  • A number of Python builtins (range, tuple, set, frozenset, list, dict) are now sped up using PEP 590 vectorcall;
  • A number of Python modules (_abc, audioop, _bz2, _codecs, _contextvars, _crypt, _functools, _json, _locale, operator, resource, time, _weakref) now use multiphase initialization as defined by PEP 489;
  • A number of standard library modules (audioop, ast, grp, _hashlib, pwd, _posixsubprocess, random, select, struct, termios, zlib) are now using the stable ABI defined by PEP 384.

More resources


Your friendly release team,
Ned Deily @nad
Steve Dower @steve.dower
Łukasz Langa @ambv

Saturday, September 5, 2020

Python 3.5.10 is now available

 Python 3.5.10 is now available.  You can get it here.

Friday, August 21, 2020